Siting Analysis for Plug-in Electric Vehicle Charging Stations in the City of Santa Monica

Siting Analysis for Plug-in Electric Vehicle Charging Stations in the City of Santa Monica

J.R. DeShazo, Sam Krumholz, Norman Wong, Jason Karpman

The transportation sector represents the largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the City of Santa Monica, comprising 64% of all GHG emissions in 2015.1 To reduce emissions from the transportation sector, and achieve carbon neutrality by 2050 or sooner, the City of Santa Monica is making a concerted effort to promote the adoption of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) that are capable of zero emissions.2 This effort, however, requires strategic investment in electric vehicle charging infrastructure (also referred to as electric vehicle supply equipment or EVSE). The lack of conveniently accessible charging infrastructure is one of the key barriers preventing PEVs from achieving a larger market share of new vehicle purchases. This barrier is particularly significant for residents in multi-unit dwellings (MUDs) who do not have access to dedicated parking spaces with outlets for charging equipment.

The purpose of this report is to provide planners and policymakers in Santa Monica with critical spatial information to inform PEV charging investment decisions, and therefore induce demand for PEVs. Since local governments face financial constraints in making EVSE investments, each investment should be as cost-effective as possible, so that each charging station is located where latent demand is the greatest, and where there is a lack of nearby charging opportunities.