Public Policy for Innovation in the Digital Age: Creating a Digitally Fluent Workforce

Public Policy for Innovation in the Digital Age: Creating a Digitally Fluent Workforce
Tuesday, April 1, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm
12:00 pm
1:30 pm
UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation
(310) 267-5435
Public
UCLA Robin & Albert Carnesale Commons, Palisades Room
330 De Neve Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90024
Add to calendar
Date: 
Tue, 04/01/2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Presented By: 
UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation
Contact Phone: 
(310) 267-5435

Location

UCLA Robin & Albert Carnesale Commons, Palisades Room
330 De Neve Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90024
United States
Open to: 
Public

PUBLIC POLICY FOR INNOVATION IN THE DIGITAL AGE SERIES

Creating a Digitally Fluent Workforce

VIEW HIGHLIGHTS, PHOTOS, AND VIDEO

Moderator

PUBLIC POLICY FOR INNOVATION IN THE DIGITAL AGE SERIES

Creating a Digitally Fluent Workforce

VIEW HIGHLIGHTS, PHOTOS, AND VIDEO

Moderator
John Villasenor Professor of Electrical Engineering and Public Policy, UCLA and Digital Technology Initiative Director, UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation

Panelists
Lori Harnick 
General Manager, Citizenship & Public Affairs, Microsoft
Sarah Holland Public Policy, Google
Jane Margolis 
Senior Researcher, UCLA Graduate School of Education & Information Studies
Todd Ullah, Ed.D. Administrator, Los Angeles Unified School District

 

Economic prosperity in the 21st century will be directly correlated to a digitally fluent workforce. This will require an education system that provides not only access to digital technologies and services, but that also fosters fluency in their use. This does not mean everyone should be a computer science major. It does mean, however, that K-12 schools and universities will need to ensure that their curricula reflect the growing ties between technology and innovation in the global digital economy.

This panel session will explore how to create a digitally fluent workforce, addressing the questions:

1. What is the level of digital fluency in the workforce today, and what are the critical gaps?

2. Other than the obvious (though not always accurate) generalization that young people are more comfortable with technology, what are some notable features of the landscape today with respect to digital fluency? What does this mean for how education regarding computing technologies should evolve?

3. What are best practices or model programs helping to democratize access and opportunities for young people to acquire computer skills?

4. What are the proper roles of the federal, state and local governments and companies in fostering digital fluency?

5. How can universities work to preserve the vital role of liberal arts education in a climate that places increasing emphasis on skills such as computer programming?

All Public Policy for Innovation in the Digital Age panels are free. Registration is required. Seating will be first come, first served. Lunch will be served. Daily parking is $12. Pay-by-space parking is also available in Parking Structure SV.