IoES/Luskin Lunch Research Seminar - Aradhna Tripati

IoES/Luskin Lunch Research Seminar - Aradhna Tripati
Monday, November 5, 2012 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
12:00 pm
1:00 pm
Institute of the Environment and Sustainability and the Luskin Center for Innovation
(310) 825-5008
Students, Faculty, Staff
La Kretz Hall, Suite 300, Large conference room
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Date: 
Mon, 11/05/2012 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Presented By: 
Institute of the Environment and Sustainability and the Luskin Center for Innovation
Contact Phone: 
(310) 825-5008

Location

La Kretz Hall, Suite 300, Large conference room
United States
Open to: 
Students, Faculty, Staff

Glacial Climate 

Aradhna Tripati

Aradhna Tripati, Assistant Professor

University of California, Los Angeles

Departments of Earth and Space Sciences & Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

 

Glacial Climate 

Aradhna Tripati

Aradhna Tripati, Assistant Professor

University of California, Los Angeles

Departments of Earth and Space Sciences & Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

 

My research group uses the sedimentary record to address fundamental questions about the dynamics of climate change, both past and future. We work on the development and application of novel geochemical tools to document and understand the evolution of temperature, ice volume, and pH. The principal aim of our research is to understand the role of the carbon cycle in changing seawater chemistry and climate.

Our research is focused on applying innovative experimental approaches in order to use the geologic record as a rich laboratory for the study of climate processes. The primary tools we use include the new 'clumped isotope' thermometer, and the elemental composition of carbonates. We also integrate geochemical measurements with field-based observations, sedimentologic and micropaleontologic data, and models.

Research topics we are currently pursuing include studying: (1) changes in tropical and subtropical climate from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present, (2) calcification and diagenetic processes that govern isotopic and elemental distributions in carbonate minerals, (3) polar climate stability during past warm intervals in Earth's history, (4) the evolution of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and its consequences on oceanic pH, and (5) the history of the major cationic composition of seawater.