IoES/Luskin Research Seminar: Stephanie Pincetl

IoES/Luskin Research Seminar: Stephanie Pincetl
Monday, November 4, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
12:00 pm
1:00 pm
Institute of the Environment and Sustainability and Luskin Center for Innovation
UCLA La Kretz Hall, Room 300A (Large conference room)
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Date: 
Mon, 11/04/2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Presented By: 
Institute of the Environment and Sustainability and Luskin Center for Innovation

Location

UCLA La Kretz Hall, Room 300A (Large conference room)
United States

"Addressing Climate Change: Regional Collaboratives"

California has a history of attempt to deal with environmental and governance issues at the regional level.  Fragmented governance, siloed decision making, layers of accretionary authority have been the result.  SB 375, one could argue,  is yet another bite at the apple.  Where do the emerging Regional Climate Collaboratives fit into this picture?  What do they look like?

"Addressing Climate Change: Regional Collaboratives"

California has a history of attempt to deal with environmental and governance issues at the regional level.  Fragmented governance, siloed decision making, layers of accretionary authority have been the result.  SB 375, one could argue,  is yet another bite at the apple.  Where do the emerging Regional Climate Collaboratives fit into this picture?  What do they look like?  What are they doing?  This is a preliminary discussion of the rise of climate collaboratives in the major urban areas of the state, and their diverse organizational structures and concerns.

 

About the speaker:

Dr. Pincetl has a Ph.D from UCLA’s former Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Planning. She has published extensively on issues of environmental policies and regulation. The content of her research is land use, land use change, with a focus on urban environments and the transformation of their natural environments. The theoretical core of her research is environmental politics, policies and governance and specifically, the ways that rules and rulemaking impact the participants in decisionmaking and the content of decisions. Rules can be formal or informal, hard or soft, but they form the boundaries of what is perceived of as possible. Dr. Pincetl has studied land use, infrastructure, and environmental preservation or services. Dr. Pincetl teaches courses on land use and the environment, environmental policies and politics in the US, and sustainable cities. She also teaches in Europe, including the Institut d’Etudes Politiques International Masters of Public Administration in Paris, and has on-going research collaborations with European collaborators. Dr Pincetl has ongoing research funded by the California state Energy Commission developing an urban metabolism framework for state energy analysis, and funded by the National Science Foundation on coupled human natural urban systems.