Luskin Innovators Speaker Series: What Makes a Great City featuring Alexander Garvin

Luskin Innovators Speaker Series: What Makes a Great City featuring Alexander Garvin
Monday, January 30, 2017 - 5:00pm - 7:00pm
5:00 pm
7:00 pm
3102675435
Public
UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, Room 2355
337 Charles E. Young Drive East
Los Angeles, CA 90095
Add to calendar
Date: 
Mon, 01/30/2017 - 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Contact Phone: 
3102675435

Location

UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, Room 2355
337 Charles E. Young Drive East
Los Angeles, CA 90095
United States
Open to: 
Public
Contact name: 
Christian Zarate

Join the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation in welcoming Alexander Garvin as he discusses his new book, What Makes a Great City, over refreshments and hors d’oeuvres.

Moderator: Cecilia Estolano, Member, Estolano LeSar Perez Advisors LLC

Panelists: Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris, Associate Dean at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs and UCLA Professor of Urban Planning; Rick Cole, City Manager, City of Santa Monica; and Vince Bertoni, Director of Planning, City of Los Angeles

Join the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation in welcoming Alexander Garvin as he discusses his new book, What Makes a Great City, over refreshments and hors d’oeuvres.

Moderator: Cecilia Estolano, Member, Estolano LeSar Perez Advisors LLC

Panelists: Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris, Associate Dean at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs and UCLA Professor of Urban Planning; Rick Cole, City Manager, City of Santa Monica; and Vince Bertoni, Director of Planning, City of Los Angeles

REGISTER HERE

Summary:

What makes a great city? Not a good city or a functional city but a great city. A city that people admire, learn from, and replicate. City planner and architect Alexander Garvin set out to answer this question by observing cities, largely in North America and Europe, with special attention to Paris, London, New York, and Vienna.

For Garvin, greatness is not just about the most beautiful, convenient, or well-managed city; it isn’t even about any “city.” It is about what people who shape cities can do to make a city great. A great city is not an exquisite, completed artifact. It is a dynamic, constantly changing place that residents and their leaders can reshape to satisfy their demands. While this book does discuss the history, demographic composition, politics, economy, topography, history, layout, architecture, and planning of great cities, it is not about these aspects alone. Most importantly, it is about the interplay between people and public realm, and how they have interacted throughout history to create great cities.

To open the book, Garvin explains that a great public realm attracts and retains the people who make a city great. He describes exactly what the term public realm means, its most important characteristics, as well as providing examples of when and how these characteristics work, or don’t. An entire chapter is devoted to a discussion of how particular components of the public realm (squares in London, parks in Minneapolis, and streets in Madrid) shape people’s daily lives. He concludes with a look at how twenty-first century initiatives in Paris, Houston, Atlanta, Brooklyn, and Toronto are making an already fine public realm even better—initiatives that demonstrate what other cities can do to improve.